If you’re reading this post, you may already be familiar with that sinking feeling that comes when your product or service has a glaring flaw that is ushering your customers out the door. It’s even worse if no one is really engaged in fixing the problem. Your first reaction might be to jump ship or you may be tempted to join the ranks and ignore the problem. But don’t give up hope. Here are three ways to address the internal retention problem.

Build a Case

The failure in case presentation is two parts, the case, and who you are presenting it to. Your case should contain specific statistics and measures in dollars of how this issue is affecting revenue. We’ve helped build many cases for clients, and we always make sure that every department understands the impact of the issue. If you hand your case to anyone, they should be able to read it and make the same conclusion as you. Second, if you are not getting the right feedback or acknowledgement, try a different audience. Your boss might have too much invested to look at your issue objectively. If he does not want to move on your case, ask him if you can present the case to someone else. Someone in your company will understand the value of this issue. You just need the right advocate to proceed.

Make Small Changes

If you have the power to create change in your organization, yet can’t simply change the entire billing, or shipping process, start small. Locate where the highest value of return would be invested for your customer, and focus there. Any improvement is just that, an improvement. You might even want to chart out all the small changes so you can see the whole plan for yourself and move from one to the next as they finish.

Jump Ship

Yes, that is what I said. If your organization can not put the focus on the customer and prevent itself from a slow self destruction, start looking for a new job. The great companies of the world have customers who love their products and services. Your retention issue is standing in the way of your company becoming a great player. If no one in the organization wants to face up to that issue, move to another organization that values the client, and embraces change and growth. Life and work are too short to waste away on a slow death.